PTSO Water Bottles

Bottle Fillers Newsflash!

NEWSFLASH: New bottle fillers installed at the high school! Your PTSO has been working to improve access to drinking water in the high school. Working with the high school, we've completed the first stage, retrofitting 7 drinking fountains with bottle fillers. Look out next for new units in the cafeteria and fieldhouse!

To go with our new bottle fillers, the PTSO is now selling a great new 17oz. double walled stainless steel water bottle guaranteed to keep your water cold and your coffee hot! $12 or $10 with PTSO membership! Look for us Fridays in September at lunch, J-K mods, Soccer Night, PTSO events, and home football games, and help us fund all the projects that matter to your school community!  Textbooks, the Homecoming Dance, security equipment are some of the projects we're working on now! Show your school spirit!

What's so great about our new bottle fillers?-- they not only make water more accessible at the high school drinking fountains, they also help the environment by reducing plastic bottles. Did you know?

  • "According to the Container Recycling Institute, 86 percent plastic of water bottles become trash. Incinerating the used bottles produces toxic byproducts, while those buried in the landfills can take up to 1,000 years to biodegrade."
    --http://www.valleywater.org/ EkContent.aspx?id=3048&terms= bottled+water
  • "In 2012, large landfills charged an average of $49.27 per ton, so with the more than 4 billion pounds of plastic bottles ending up in landfills, municipalities are paying at least $98 million a year to dispose of bottled water waste."
    --https://www. foodandwaterwatch.org/sites/ default/files/ Take%20Back%20the%20Tap%20FS% 20July%202013.pdf
  • "The plastic bottles that aren't recycled end up in landfills or find their way into waterways and finally into the oceans, where they pose a long-term threat to marine life."
    --http://sciencing.com/ bottled-water-contributor- global-warming-22693.html
  • "Tap water is, in fact, subjected to more rigorous testing and purity standards than bottled water. According to a four-year study by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), a third of the bottled water tested contained levels of contamination. A key NRDC finding is that bottled water regulations are inadequate to assure consumers of either purity or safety."
    --http://www.valleywater.org/ EkContent.aspx?id=3048&terms= bottled+water
  • "Buying bottled water is like pouring money down the drain. Bottled water costs from $0.89 per gallon to $8.26 per gallon, compared to fractions of a penny for water from your tap. That makes bottled water thousands of times more expensive than tap water."
    --https://www. foodandwaterwatch.org/about/ live-healthy/tap-water-vs- bottled-water
  • "[Making plastic bottles] releases a host of toxic chemicals, including acetone, methyl ethyl ketone and toluene, into the atmosphere. It also releases greenhouse gases, including sulfur oxides, nitrous oxides and volatile organic compounds. These global warming gases enter the atmosphere whether... the manufacturing process uses recycled or new materials."
    --http://sciencing.com/ bottled-water-contributor- global-warming-22693.html
  • "In 2007, U.S. bottled water consumption had an energy-input equivalent of between 32 and 54 million barrels of oil. Over the course of a year, that amount of energy could fuel anywhere between 1.2 and 2.1 million cars, or an average of 1.6 million cars annually."
    --https://www. foodandwaterwatch.org/sites/ default/files/Take%20Back% 20the%20Tap%20FS%20July% 202013.pdf
  • The Pacific Institute estimates that the total amount of energy embedded in our use of bottled water can be as high as the equivalent of filling a plastic bottle one quarter full with oil.
    --http://pacinst.org/ publication/bottled-water-and- energy-a-fact-sheet/
  • The Pacific Institute estimates that twice as much water is used in the production process. Thus, every liter sold represents three liters of water.
    --http://pacinst.org/ publication/bottled-water-and- energy-a-fact-sheet/
  • According to a study by researchers for the Pacific Institute, the manufacture, production and transportation of bottled water is 1,100 to 2,000 times as energy intensive as the treatment and distribution of tap water.
    --https://www. foodandwaterwatch.org/sites/ default/files/Take%20Back% 20the%20Tap%20FS%20July% 202013.pdf